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Colgate Supports Helping Babies Sleep Safely

Every year 3,600 infants die due to sleep-related deaths

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the unexplained death, usually during sleep, of a seemingly healthy baby less than a year old. Of those, about 90 percent of SIDS cases occur before baby hits the 6-month mark.

SIDS is sometimes known as crib death because the infants often die in their cribs. In 79 percent of these cases, babies were either sleeping in an adult bed or in their crib/bassinet with pillows, blankets, stuffed animals, fluffy bumpers or loose clothing. 

These deaths can be prevented by following the Safe Sleep Guidelines developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2016.

What does a safe crib environment look like?

Did you receive the most beautiful handmade blanket or precious stuffed animal from a friend or family member? We know you may feel the desire to let your baby sleep with their cute gift, but keep it clean and simple when setting up your crib. 

Here are five tips to creating the safest sleep environment for your baby:

  1. Always lay your baby on his or her back in the crib. Babies should always sleep on their backs to reduce the risk of SIDS.
  2. Use a firm, flat mattress in a safety-approved crib. A firm surface maintains its shape and will not indent or conform to the shape of the infant’s head when placed on the surface. Soft mattresses can create a pocket (or indentation) and increase the chance of rebreathing or suffocation if the infant is placed in or rolls over to the prone (face down) position. Also, the crib should not have bumper pads.
  3. Share your room with baby and keep baby close to your bed, but in their own crib or bassinet. Room sharing reduces the risk of SIDS. Baby should not sleep in an adult bed, on a couch or on a chair alone, with you or with anyone else. Having a separate safe sleep surface for the baby reduces the risk of SIDS and the chance of suffocation, strangulation and entrapment.
  4. Keep baby’s sleeping area free of soft and loose bedding, such as bumpers, stuffed animals and blankets. Soft objects, such as pillows and pillow-like toys, quilts, and loose bedding such non-fitted sheets, can obstruct an infant’s nose and mouth. An obstructed airway can pose a risk of suffocation, entrapment, or SIDS.
  5. If the crib is near a window, remove pull cords or use cord shorteners on window dressings. Those curious little arms like to reach out and cords can so easily get wrapped around your precious little one.

By following these simple guidelines, you can help reduce your infants’ risk of SIDS.

How can you help spread awareness?

We’re asking moms, dads and parent influencers to help model a safe sleep environment to generate visibility for unaware parents, grandparents and other caregivers and help them understand the vital importance of safe sleep practices.

By committing only to post images of babies in safe sleep situations you can become one of First Candle’s Safe Sleep Guardians. First Candle is a nonprofit organization that is dedicated to reducing the rates of SIDS and educating new and expectant parents on the importance of providing a safe sleep environment for their baby. And for those families who have tragically lost a baby, they offer bereavement support and counsel.

Colgate Mattress has a longstanding relationship with First Candle and is honored to be a Safe Sleep Guardian. We encourage you to also show that you support First Candle and are committed to helping us save babies’ lives.

September is Baby Safety Month

baby safety month sleeping

Colgate Mattress understands that being a parent is the biggest responsibility you will ever have in your life. After all, as a third-generation, family-owned business – we’ve been there too! While you’re hard at work loving and nourishing your little one, protecting your baby is always a top priority. That starts with an excellent choice of crib mattress and continues with healthy practices and safety measures.

Launched by the Juvenile Products Manufacturing Association (JPMA), Baby Safety Month is a great time to reassess your routine to ensure you’re using healthy habits, best practices and safety precautions to keep your baby as safe as possible.

According to the JPMA, each year in the United States there are approximately 3,500 Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID). These deaths occur among infants less than 1 year old and have no immediately obvious cause. Although the causes of death in many of these infants cannot be explained, statistics show that as many as 80-90 percent are the result of unsafe sleep practices.

At Colgate, we’ve created the D.R.E.A.M. SAFE sleep practices to help protect your baby from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS):

 

D ~ DO place baby on her back to sleep.
Always place your baby on his or her back to sleep, for naps and at night.
R ~ REMEMBER a FIRM crib mattress is always best.
Firmness aids in development of baby’s muscles and bones. Soft beds naturally give and contour which can impede a babies breathing and trap heat, which can also be dangerous.
E ~ ELIMINATE clutter.
Do not put anything soft, loose or fluffy in your baby’s sleep space. Only a fitted sheet, mattress pad or waterproof pad should be used under baby.
A ~ ALWAYS place baby in the crib to sleep.
Never place your baby to sleep on top of any soft surface. This includes adult beds, couches, pillows, cushions, comforters and sheepskins.
M ~ MONITOR air flow and temperature.
Make sure your baby doesn’t get too warm during sleep. Use lightweight sleep clothing and keep room temperature at what would be comfortable for a lightly-clothed adult. For newborns, consider swaddling.

 

Expert Mom Tip: Nighttime feedings become simpler with a nursing chemise, which allows you to readily breastfeed when your baby is ready. Dads can help too! Incorporate daddy into your nighttime routine to help with burping and changing nighttime diapers so you can get a little more much needed sleep.

By integrating theses safe sleep habits, you will help ensure the safety of your baby every time they rest. For more safe sleep tips, please visit the JPMA’s Safe Sleep Center.